Homeschool

The Dr. Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry will be closed beginning Wednesday, Nov. 23rd for the Thanksgiving Holiday. The NMD will reopen to the public on Wednesday, Dec. 7th.

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Take a bite out of history, health, and STEAM with our interactive onsite field trip programs. Choose from one of the curated programs below, join us for a guided tour of all the exhibits, or go through the museum at your own pace. Coordinate your own visit, or join us for our reduced price homeschooler days every third Wednesday of the month!

For more information about NMD's educational offerings, please contact the Museum Education Coordinator, Elise Petersen, at 410-706-4819 or epetersen@umaryland.edu.

Fossilized Mastadon Tooth in blue circleBITE-SIZED BIOLOGY:
BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION | GRADE 3

Students encounter key concepts and vocabulary for Grade 3 science including fossils, natural selection, and adaptation. Students will create their own fossils to take home, have a hands-on experience with replicas of real fossils, and view animal skulls and teeth from the musuem's collection to make inferences about various animals' environments and adaptability. Cost: $5/student

Bite-Sized Biology: Biological Evolution Program Packet

Bite-Sized Biology: Biological Evolution Curriculum Standards

NGSS 3-LS4 (1-4): Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

  • 3-LS4-1: Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago. Students will handle and analyze tooth fossil replicas from three extinct animals to identify various types of fossil data (shape, size, shine, sharpness). With guidance from a museum educator, students will make inferences about the animals based on the data they have collected, including the animals’ approximate size, diet, and closest living relative.
  • 3-LS4-2: Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing. Students will consider, observe, and handle real-world examples of plant and animal characteristics that enable survival and reproduction, including two species common in Maryland: peppered moths and maple trees.
  • 3-LS4-3: Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. Students will analyze real skulls and teeth of three animals (African warthogs, sharks, and horses) to identify the adaptations that enable these animals to survive and thrive in their native habitats. With guidance from a museum educator, students will discuss what would happen if any two of these animals swapped environments—would their adaptations help them survive in their new environments? Why or why not?
  • 3-LS4-4: Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change. Students will revisit three species previously discussed in the program and consider imaginary shifts to the environments of each of the species (peppered moths, roses, and horses). Students will brainstorm potential ways each species might adapt to survive and learn about real-world examples of how the species (or similar species) have adapted to survive the very same challenges.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY: Speaking and Listening

  • ELA.LITERACY.SL.3.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. Students will engage with a museum educator, peers, teachers, and chaperones during fossil identification and animal observation activities.
  • ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.2: Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Students will encounter presentation of information in a variety of media formats, including visual and quantitative presentations throughout the museum, oral presentations from the museum educator, and video presentations by external organizations including the Smithsonian Institution. Through various activities, students will determine the main ideas of presented information.
  • ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.3: Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail. Students will engage with a museum speaker to ask and answer questions related to presented information.
Opossum skull in a black circleBITE-SIZED BIOCHEM:
STRUCTURES OF LIVING ORGANISMS | GRADE 4

Students observe plant and animal specimens from the museum's collection and consider the physical structures that help organisms survive and thrive. Students will experience a hands-on activity modeling sensory information collection and processing and draw on the experience to discuss the ways animals collect, interpret, and respond to information about their environments. Cost: $5/student

Bite-Sized Biochem: Structures of Living Organisms Program Packet

Bite-Sized Biochem: Structures of Living Organisms Curriculum Standards

NGSS 4-LS1 (1-2): From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

  • 4-LS1-1: Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. Students will encounter many examples of internal and external plant and animal structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. Items will include animal skulls and teeth from the museum's collection as well as the seeds of a common Maryland species (the maple tree).
  • 4-LS1-2: Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways. Students will engage in a sensory activity using Jelly Belly jellybeans which models the ways animals use their senses to receive and process information about their environments. Following the activity, a museum educator will lead the students in a follow-up discussion to help students relate their experience to the ways animals use their senses to help them survive, grow, behave, and reproduce.

ELA-LITERACY: Speaking and Listening

  • ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. Students will engage with a museum educator, peers, teachers, and chaperones during discussions and activities about the structures and processes of plant and animal organisms.
  • ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.2: Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Students will encounter presentation of information in a variety of media formats, including visual and quantitative presentations throughout the museum, oral presentations from the museum educator, and video presentations by external organizations and creators. Through various activities, students will determine the main ideas of presented information.
  • ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.3: Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points. Students will engage with a museum speaker to ask and answer questions related to presented information.
Bamboo toothbrushes, eco-friendly toothpaste, and leaves in a pink circlePROTECT YOUR TEETH,
PROTECT YOUR PLANET | GRADE 5

Students are invited to consider a common househould object (the toothbrush) in a new light: using algebraic reasoning, students model the number of toothbrushes deposited annually in landfills across the United States in a visually meaningful way. Students will also encounter sustainability concepts including recycling and sustainable material science. Cost: $5/student

Protect Your Teeth, Protect Your Planet Program Packet

Protect Your Teeth, Protect Your Planet Curriculum Standards

NGSS 4-LS1 (1-2): From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

  • 4-LS1-1: Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. Students will encounter many examples of internal and external plant and animal structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. Items will include animal skulls and teeth from the museum's collection as well as the seeds of a common Maryland species (the maple tree).
  • 4-LS1-2: Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways. Students will engage in a sensory activity using Jelly Belly jellybeans which models the ways animals use their senses to receive and process information about their environments. Following the activity, a museum educator will lead the students in a follow-up discussion to help students relate their experience to the ways animals use their senses to help them survive, grow, behave, and reproduce.

ELA-LITERACY: Speaking and Listening

  • ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. Students will engage with a museum educator, peers, teachers, and chaperones during discussions and activities about the structures and processes of plant and animal organisms.
  • ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.2: Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Students will encounter presentation of information in a variety of media formats, including visual and quantitative presentations throughout the museum, oral presentations from the museum educator, and video presentations by external organizations and creators. Through various activities, students will determine the main ideas of presented information.
  • ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.3: Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points. Students will engage with a museum speaker to ask and answer questions related to presented information.
MouthPower Giant Open Mouth in a Yellow CircleHEALTHY MOUTH,
HEALTHY BODY TOUR | GRADES PK-5

Students encounter key concepts about proper oral health care and experience the history of dentistry firsthand. Students will explore the origins of the teeth, find out what the first toothbrush was like, and have the opportunity to become a dentist, dental hygienist, or dental assistant in MouthPower, one of our interactive exhibits. Cost: $5/student


 

A Stuffed Hermey the Misfit Elf in a pink circleDENTISTRY
AND HEALTH TOUR | GRADES 6-12

Students re-encounter key concepts about proper oral health care and learn about dentistry as a career choice. Students will learn about each of the dental specialties, the allied professions, and dental research, along with exploring an exhibit on bioengineering, forensics, and saliva. Students will also learn about the Changing Faces of dentistry with a new exhibit exploring the progress of diversity in the dental profession. Cost: $5/student


FAQs

Are there any restrictions or guidelines in place due to COVID-19?

The NMD currently encourages its visitors to wear masks or face coverings while indoors. Complimentary masks are available at our front desk. The past restrictions on group size and physical distancing have been lifted.

For more information about the COVID-19 guidelines we are following, please visit https://www.umaryland.edu/coronavirus/resources/

How long does a visit to the National Museum of Dentistry last?

Typical visits to the Dr. Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry last about 1-1.5 hours. Plan for a little longer stay if you'd like to let your students get items from the gift shop, explore the museum on their own, or eat lunch.

How much does a trip to the NMD cost?

Join us during the third Wednesday of every month for our homeschooler days with reduced admission: $3 per student, while caregivers and children under 2 receive free admission.

Admission for students is $5, while caregivers and children under 2 receive free admission. If you plan a trip for February or October, however, admission for students is only $2 to celebrate National Children's Dental Health Month and National Dental Hygiene Month.

If you're a Title I elementary school, ask about our Making Schools Smile program, which provides free admission and a bus for Title I elementary schools across Maryland.

Do I or my students need to bring anything?

All you have to bring are some smiles! If you want activity packets or other resources available to your students, make sure to request them before your visit. The NMD will supply any writing utensils and printed materials that you need to get the most out of your visit. If you plan on eating lunch at the museum, let us know in advance so we can have a table set up to store your lunches during the tour.

Do you have a gift shop?

Yes! The NMD has two cases full of dental related toys and products, and your class is welcome to purchase items from the gift shop AT THE END of your tour.

Can we eat lunch at the museum?

Although we do not have food to purchase, your class is more than welcome to bring packed lunches or purchase lunches from nearby restaurants to eat at the museum. During your tour, lunches can be stored on tables in the museum's atrium, which always has a security guard or staff person present.

Can we take pictures?

Pictures are always welcome at the museum! We do, however, request that students do not use phones during the tour. We'd also love to share your visit! If you're interested in sharing your school's oral health pride, have your students fill out and bring this Photo Consent Form to the museum on the day of your visit.

What if our school or district has a delay or closure on the day of our visit?

As soon as you find out, let us know! We are always happy to reschedule, and also understand if a closure or delays means you won't be able to make it to the museum this year due to scheduling. If you paid in advance, you will receive a full refund.

Also, the NMD typically follows the same closures and delays for Baltimore City Public Schools. We will also let you know as soon as possible if we are going to be closed due to inclement weather, and we always put an announcement at the top of our website and on our voicemail.

 


Contact Us

National Museum of Dentistry
31 S. Greene Street,
Baltimore, MD 21201

Click for directions

 

Patrick Cutter
Assistant Director

Phone: 410-706-0600
Email: pcutter@umaryland.edu

 

Dr. Scott Swank
Curator

Phone: 410-706-8704
Email: sswank@umaryland.edu

Hours & Admission

Wed-Friday 10am to 4pm

Individual:

Members, Military, UMB Community, Teachers, and Children (2 and under): FREE
Adults: $10
Seniors and Students: $5
Children (3-12): $5

Group:

Members, Military, UMB Community, Teachers, and Children (2 and under): FREE
Adults: $8
Seniors and Students: $5
Children: (3-12): $5

 

Donate

There are a number of ways you can show your support for the National Museum of Dentistry.

In addition to cash donations, which can be pledged by check or credit card, the NMD happily accepts gifts of stock, planned or deferred contributions, and in-kind services. To discuss giving options, please contact the SOD Development Office.

Looking to donate items to the NMD's collection, please visit our Collections and Archives page for more information.